Tag Archives: trambahn

July Gaming Round-up

I’m back! Major cycling event out of the way (106 miles completed, £590 raised for ME Research UK), last days of first school for the firstborn completed, first couple of weeks of summer holidays navigated. And plenty of gaming done in the interim. Here’s July.

Corbridge Gamers

One from the bottom of John’s pile – Hamburgum. And it really doesn’t deserve to be on the bottom of anyone’s pile. It’s a real cracker.

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End of the game. You can see the lovely resources at the left-hand side of the photo, including real bells!

Rondel manipulation, resource management, area control… there’s a bit of each of them, and it all comes together into a splendid whole. The theme comes through nicely (increasing influence in Hamburg by contributing to the building of churches) and there’s a wonderfully evil mechanism in the shipping area, where newly added ships push out the older ships. Somehow, I always managed to stay on the upper hand in that little race, which really helped me power through to a win, 175–153.

My little bit of Hamburg.

My little bit of Hamburg. With the right scoring multiplier tiles, this was quite a points haul.

As usual with a lot of the games John and I play, I’d like to try it with more players, but it was really enjoyable with two.

On the other session we managed in July, we played Mykerinos – which was so underwhelming as to not warrant further mention – and Trambahn, which I enjoyed just as much as the first time I sampled its clearly-18xx-influenced tableau-building delights. This time I was hit with a series of poor card draws (and a smattering of rash decisions), so John’s 155–118 win was unsurprising.

Newcastle Gamers

Three sessions in July, what with the summer holidays bringing about an extra, all-day session on the penultimate Saturday of the month!

Session 1

Arkwright! I’d picked this up about a week before the session and had some solo learning attempts at home, first at the introductory Spinning Jenny game, then the full Water Frame version. I felt that SJ was a bit too light and unrewarding for the amount of effort it takes, so I convinced Olly and John Sh that WF was worth the extra learning effort and that it wasn’t that tough. I mean, it isn’t complicated in terms of the general mechanics of each turn – pick an action, pay the cost, do the thing. Simple, right?

Well, it turns out that with four players (John B joined us) there’s an awful lot going on besides that, and a lot to think about across several areas of the (very full) table.

So many charts. So many cubes. So many pawns.

So many charts. So many cubes. So many pawns. So much bookkeeping.

To cut to the chase: I really enjoyed Arkwright, but it was bloody hard work. I think it would be greatly rewarded by lots of experience, but I doubt I’ll get the chance to find out, such was the effort required. The production/sales phase alone (which we experienced twenty times over the course of the game) was so unintuitive to first-time players that it was very difficult to predict and quite tedious to play out.

Final score – Me: £506 / Olly: £506 / John B: £364 / John Sh: £171

Olly and I were level on portfolio value (one of us had 22 shares at £23 each, the other 23 shares at £22) but I won on the cash-in-hand tie-break, £8 to £1.

John B left and we were joined by Lloyd for the much lighter new game from Martin Wallace, Via Nebula. Bizarre theme and lovely production values aside (that inlay!), this was a perfectly fine if slightly unexciting route-building, pick-up-and-deliver-while-building-stuff game.

Lovely wooden bits.

Lovely wooden bits.

A bit like Age of Steam (of which more later), there’s a slow opening, a long build and a sudden finish… but all packed into about 45 minutes. So I’d be perfectly happy to fill a gap with it again, even if it did feel a little… meh.

Final score – John Sh: 27 / Olly: 23 / Me: 21 / Lloyd: 20

Session 2

What better to do with an all-day session than some 18xx? This time, it was 1844, set in Switzerland, with Olly and Ali. As 18xx games go, it’s a reasonably vanilla one, playing a lot like 1830 with just a few thematic wrinkles like tunnels, mountain railways, H-trains and four different types of company… one of which is the nationalised SBB, coming into being at the beginning of Phase 5 when all five precursor companies are merged.

A bit like 1865: Sardinia (which I seem to have played twice since my last gaming blog post – yikes), many of the railway companies have historical destinations; in 1844, reaching the historical destination means the company receives the 50% of capitalisation it didn’t get when it floated. With some of these companies having only four shares, the half-capitalisation and a top par price of 100 Francs means it can be tough to get anywhere to start with (200 Fr doesn’t go far). And with up to 14 companies on the go at once (although I don’t think we got above 11), the trains get snapped up thick and fast, sometimes leaving many companies trainless.

Mid-game

Late-game board.

I think we played the route-building fairly non-aggressively for most of the game, but we made up for it towards the end. Awkward routing and tokening-out of stations was the order of the day by the later phases, and there were a lot of sudden drops in company revenues when previously beautiful routes were abruptly terminated. Of course, with such a high certificate limit with three players, blocking routes often hurt the blocker almost as much as the blocked company director – after all, we were all at least slightly invested in most of the companies.

Olly had ended up with directorship of the SBB, having had most shares in the five precursor companies. Naturally, having most shares there (and the four trains it could run when most others were restricted to two) meant Olly was getting the biggest chunk of the biggest payouts. I’d done my usual 18xx thing of “strong start, weak finish” and had to payout personal funds for forced train purchases… twice! They weren’t huge, but they were enough to put me out of pocket going into stock rounds and leave me lagging.

1844 end

End of the game. Running only a single train with each of my companies certainly didn’t help.

The auxiliary table holding unsold shares, share prices, track tiles and the illegible scrawlings that tracked revenues from round to round.

The auxiliary table holding unsold shares, the stock market chart, track tiles and my illegible scrawlings that tracked revenues from round to round.

Final score – Olly: 8938 / Me: 6935 / Ali: 6593

As usual with 18xx, a convincing win for Olly. And as usual, I felt like I was getting a grasp on things about one or two rounds too late. Another play of this and I’ll feel more secure with it.

Session 3

With a double booking at the church hall meaning there was a small crowd of gamers standing around in the car park for potentially two hours, Olly, John Sh and I decamped to Olly’s house for a quick game of Age of Steam: France before heading back to continue the session. I say “quick”… it’s not anywhere simple enough to be genuinely “quick”. It is simple enough to pick up very quickly though, and first-time-player John schooled us, 102–88–81 (me last). I hadn’t twigged just how lucrative Paris could be, and I hamstrung myself early on with a few too-low turn-order bids and last position on the turn track.

Back at Christ Church, the session was in full swing when we arrived, with a few people just reaching the end of a game. We added Jon C to our trio and played Roll for the Galaxy (no expansion – it hasn’t been a popular addition when I’ve tried it). Olly went for a quick-building win and just managed it; my development-heavy approach was much too slow to keep pace, points-wise. That said, it was a low-scoring game all round.

Final score – Olly: 31 / Jon C: 27 / John Sh: 25 / Me: 22

Jon had Quadropolis in his big box o’ games, and I’ve been interested in giving it a go ever since its release. It’s a sort of city-building game with a huge chunk of spatial puzzling involved. I’m not necessarily the best at spatial stuff – not that I don’t enjoy route-building and tile-laying games, but I tend to work better without physical grids to work on – and Quadropolis was no exception to that. While the rules themselves are simple (even for the “Expert” version we were playing) and this is a family game at heart, it took me a fair while to get my head round the positioning puzzle. Jon was clearly going for harbours and skyscrapers; Olly was concentrating on monuments and civic buildings; I was… doing a bit of everything and doing it all fairly badly.

Final score – Olly: 91 / Jon C: 81 / Me: 78 / John Sh: 71

My finished city borough.

My finished city borough.

I’m not sure what to make of Quadropolis. There doesn’t seem quite enough to it for a gamer crowd, but it seems a little too thinky for families. Maybe it’s just not my sort of game. It looked quite pretty though, I’ll give it that.

Last up was the unpredictable madness of Donald X’s Temporum. To be fair, I’ve played it at two players and it felt much tighter and more controlled; with four, it felt like a Carl Chudyk game. All plans from one turn were entirely void by the next, given how much everything could change in between. We opted to change our Age I card partway through the game, because the original one made it far too tempting to just sit in Age I and do nothing but draw, play and score cards. Experience clearly played its part and John took a convincing win, but I ended up only one “point” behind. I’d be happy to play again with two… maybe three… but for me, Temporum was pretty unsatisfying with four players.

And that’s July done. Back on the blogging horse now, so hopefully I’ll be a bit more frequent in future.

T for Two – March Gaming Roundup

I’ve done it again. I’ve gone and left it a whole month between posts. Gah. I’ve had a Pandemic Legacy post gestating for a while (given that we finished our campaign way back in February) and there’s another post brewing about a recent… ahem… descent into Ameritrash territory, but here’s a quick spin through March.

John and I have played some corkers in Corbridge this month, almost all beginning with “T”: Tzolk’in: The Mayan CalendarTrajan (with Port Royal to round off that evening), Terra Mystica and the double-whammy of Tash-Kalar and Trambahn. Yes, by the end of the month we’d realised the accidental T-theme and played into it deliberately.

Tzolk’in and Terra Mystica were two games I’d played once a couple of years ago, really enjoyed and then inexplicably hadn’t played since. It astonished me quite now much I remembered of both, mechanics-wise, although the finer points of the rules and strategies had largely escaped me.

For Tzolk’in, I made a few mistakes in terms of timing… and timing is everything in this game. Knowing when to place workers onto wheels and when to take them off, especially when you can only place or remove workers in one turn – never both – was something that slightly eluded me, and I took a couple of very inefficient turns that threw me well behind in terms of tempo. I did manage to disrupt one or two of John’s plans, but nowhere near enough.

Final score – John: 74 / Me: 39

Ouch. I did get a vague feeling of “oh, yes, I remember why I haven’t played it since the first time”, but I couldn’t lay my finger on quite what the reason was. Very odd. I think there’s always just something else I’d rather play.

Trajan was familiar territory and I used all my experience from boiteajeux.com to lay down a hammering on John. I shipped loads of cards and got whacking great bonuses from the Senate bonus tiles I’d engineered my way towards (and the ones I’d ended up with by accident) to finish the game 161–128. It made up a little for the shocking Tzolk’in anyway.

Port Royal (another Alexander Pfister design, after recent plays of Isle of Skye and Oh My Goods) was nothing spectacular, although it did make me wonder if my 8-year-old would manage/enjoy it. I’m not a huge fan of push-your-luck mechanisms, and there’s a big one that drives the core of this game.

Unlike Tzolk’in, the lack of plays of Terra Mystica is a complete mystery to me. I really like this game. It’s heavy, it’s pretty and it doesn’t outstay its welcome.

My largest halfling city, next door to John's grey dwarfville.

My largest halfling city, next door to John’s grey dwarfville with its under-river tunnels.

My halflings had cheap digging upgrades so I tried to go for that as early as possible. Naturally, there were a load of other things to do before that was even feasible, so John and I pretty much matched each other step for step, carefully trying to avoid giving each other Power from building adjacent to existing buildings. We tussled a little on the Cult board, but nothing momentous happened until right at the very end of the game, when the jostling finally gave way and I used my Power bowls to devastating effect, edging ahead for the win.

Final score – Me: 113 / John: 99

…which is, oddly, almost the score we finished with the first time we played, and exactly the same winning margin (110–96). Great stuff. Must play again soon, and with more than two!

Tash-Kalar… well, it’s a decent game and I like the constant back and forth, although it can feel a bit too swingy at times. Also, it transpired that John had played all our games (and half of this one) without realising that you can not only rotate the patterns of pieces required for summoning, but you can mirror them too. So that was possibly a factor in my melee victory this time round. I keep coming back to this game, even though (again) I can’t quite pin down exactly why.

Trambahn turned out to be a bit of an unexpected treat. Designed by Helmut Ohley (of Russian Railroads and a whole scad of 18xx games), it combines Lost Cities with San Juan alongside a couple of simple ideas from 18xx to create a nicely thinky, slightly luck-dependent tableau-building game that plays quickly. There’s definitely more than meets the eye with this one, and John’s extra experience with the game certainly paid off against a few very lucky hands that I’d had.

Final score – John: 177 / Me: 154

Beyond our regular Wednesday sessions in Corbridge, I was home alone for all of the Easter weekend. It was glorious. If there’s one thing I yearn for, it’s time on my own. And living where we do, away from main roads and general hubbub, it was completely silent for two whole days.

Of course, I made the trip over to Newcastle Gamers that Saturday for Roads & Boats, that now-ancient progenitor of… pretty much every resource-conversion euro that ever was. We used the special scenario designed for two experienced players to play against two newcomers; Olly and I had played a couple of times before, while John and Ali were first-timers to this “Le Havre with logistics”. As it turned out, I’m not convinced two plays is enough to count as “experienced”. What really happened is that Olly and I just had to spend ages organising ourselves into sea-based transport in order to reach the mountains in the centre of the board, while John and Ali got on with mining.

However, because we’d had extra time to build up, both Olly and I had researched specialised mines before building any. (In fact, I didn’t even get round to building a mine or stealing anyone’s gold before the end of the game, which explains my hideously low score.) So while John and Ali had easily collected all three gold from their one mine each by the end of the game, it had taken six rounds to guarantee those three gold; Olly had picked up one gold per round in the last few rounds before the game ended.

azdg

The whole world. A couple of timing/resource errors/hubris meant I (red) was a few turns behind Olly (yellow) in reaching the mainland. Rafts would have been better than rowboats.

I had a reasonable points showing from the Wonder – and I’d helped to accelerate the end of the game once I’d realised how much of a mess I’d made of things – but it just wasn’t enough in the face of gold. It had been a very solitaire-ish game, with not a single wall built and no stolen goods whatsoever.

Final score – Olly: 69 / John: 61 / Ali: 55 / Me: 36

We’d actually played quite quickly, so we pulled out My Village next. It turned out to be the game for the rest of the night, but that was fine by me – I really like it. I went heavy on the monks, getting a full church before turning my hand to properly concentrate on other things. The full church wasn’t quite enough to combat everyone else’s huge swathe of goods sold though (there really are a lot of points in getting a goods/merchants engine going) and it ended up being a very close-run game.

Final score – Olly: 50 / Me: 49 / John: 48 / Ali: 43

The day after that, with my house still empty, I did this:

By far the loveliest of all the COIN boards.

By far the loveliest of all the COIN boards.

Yes, it was the latest instalment in GMT’s COIN series, Liberty or Death: The American Insurrection, taking the now-well-established COIN system and using it to model the American War of Independence. I played a medium-length-scenario solo game as the British (naturally) and just lost to the AI flowchart bots. It’s thankfully a step down in complexity from the last COIN game, Fire in the Lake, of which I’ve never managed a full solo game. Still a huge amount to think about though, and it was a really engaging and enjoyable six-or-so hours. (Possibly more than six actually… working through the bot flowcharts can be tough the first few times.)

More soon! Hopefully!