Tag Archives: concordia

Early October Gaming

Having realised I’ve skipped over an excellent evening with John learning both YINSH and The Ravens of Thri Sahashri (delightfully brain-burning and baffling respectively), I thought I’d better start catching up before I forget everything that’s ever happened. As the autumn kicks in, my chronic fatigue syndrome tends to get a bit worse, which means worse sleep and a deterioration in mental acuity. It’ll come back, but it takes a little while.

Corbridge Gamers

Wednesday evenings have become a little congested recently, with my eldest son having decided that football is his sport of choice. That means football practice 6–7 pm on Wednesdays, which starts interfering with the traditional Corbridge Gamers slot once we factor in the little things like, y’know… eating and stuff. Harrumph.

As a result of this interference, I was running very late for our first October session, but John took matters into his own hands and set up Leaving Earth before I’d even arrived. It’s like High Frontier but… more of a game. There’s still a fair bit of maths involved in working out mass vs thrust, but there isn’t the mind-numbing fuel spreadsheet-thing and there’s no “roll a 6 and everything explodes”. Instead, all risks are mitigable by testing your components before you actually set off on your journey and fuel mass is kind of integrated into the components, which are instead simply “used up” by being fired into space.

We were playing with only some of the planets available, and it was still a total table-hog even with only two players.

Space is big. Even when it's only a little bit of space.

Space is big. Even when it’s only a little bit of space.

Of course, having said that “all risks are mitigable”, I actually fired Yuri Gagarin into orbit without doing much testing, just so I could beat John to a few of our randomly-drawn scoring criteria (first human in space and first human to return from orbit, or something like that). The luck of the draw worked out – two-thirds of the Outcome cards are successes, after all – and the VPs were mine. That put me substantially ahead, so all I needed to do was fire off a probe in the general direction of Ceres in order to get enough points to win. Well, I had to successfully land it first without it exploding.

Thankfully, it’s entirely possible to do your testing after you’ve sent your probe off on its mission, so once Suicide II was on its way to Ceres, I set about pumping probes into Earth orbit and landing them again. It turned out to be a wise programme, given that several of the rockets and probes either blew up or crashed into a hillside. By the time my probe reached Ceres, all the problems had been ironed out (and the software update presumably transmitted to the probe) and I touched down gracefully for the victory.

Leaving Earth was a lot of fun, beautifully presented in a retro fashion (and, being based on a 1950s understanding of space travel, you don’t know what the Moon’s going to be like until you land on it…) and I’m looking forward to exploring more of it with more players.

A week later, John and I returned to Concordia, this time on my recently acquired Britannia map. It’s designed to be tighter and more blocking than some of the other maps, but with the option to get around the coast quite quickly by sea. I took advantage of the sea movement to get spread out, then concentrated on Brick and Food cities (while John concentrated on the potentially-more-lucrative-but-fewer-in-number Wine and Cloth cities) and picked up the Farmer and Mason cards when they came up.

With my buildings in the vast majority of Brick and Food cities, the final scoring was dominated by my Farmer and Mason cards, along with a good showing in Saturnus scoring (I was in almost every province, while John had concentrated in the south and south-west). In a nutshell, a resounding hammering by me, 125–71. Great game; it should be played more often.

Newcastle Gamers

The first Newcastle session of the month began with a return to Nippon, which I’d been keen to play since its first outing last year. I played with Olly, plus club newcomers Alba and Jordan; it was possibly a bit heavier than the games Alba and Jordan were used to, but it’s very much medium-weight rather than truly heavy and they seemed to grasp it very quickly.

I’ll come straight out with it – this game is way better at four players than two. I remember two felt too spread out on the map, with little in the way of influence interaction and not much threat of running out of space to place trains and ships. Four was nicely tight, with several occasions where I couldn’t do the thing I wanted to do because someone else had just crept in and put a high number down where I wanted to go. The worker-colour game was a bit more interesting too. Given that you want to minimise the number of colours you take (in order to reduce your wage bill when consolidating) and you can see the colours that will be added to the options when spaces are emptied… but you can’t predict exactly where they’ll end up… there was a bit of hedging of bets and frustratingly failed predictions. Exactly the sort of thing I like in a game.

A vertiginous view of the endgame

A vertiginous view of the endgame situation – photo from an awkward angle by Olly

I’d messed up some of my early placements of score multipliers, thinking I’d excel at things I actually did quite badly at, so I ended up scoring things like 5 times 1 for the knowledge track instead of 5 times 5. That alone cost me the win; Jordan had managed his score multipliers much more effectively and actually scored well for the things he’d been good at.

Final score – Jordan: 172 / Me: 171 / Olly: 171 / Alba: 97

Yes, that’s about as tight as you can get for the top three positions (although Olly had inadvertently cheated in the early game by not paying for his first factory, so he should probably have been a few points down from there). But anyway, Nippon: it’s not amazing, but it’s very good, and the weight means it’s probably easier to get it played than other games from the same designers, like Madeira or Panamax.

Alba and Jordan left and were replaced by Ali for a three-player Age of Industry on the New England map. As usual for this map, there was a scarcity of coal so things got quite expensive quite quickly, the building slots clogged up and there was a bit of overbuilding towards the end. I didn’t get quite as much coastal presence as I would have liked (and certainly not as much as the other two), but I did manage to build up a fair few higher-level industries inland and get quite a few rail connections laid in lucrative places.

Final score – Olly: 44 / Me: 43 / Ali: 36

stuff

Not enough coastal yellow

I do prefer Brass, but Age of Industry has enough differences to feel like the comparison isn’t entirely fair; it stands up well on its own merits.

Camo joined us for Kingdom Builder, in which I played with my usual lack of panache, but at least I didn’t come last. I just don’t seem to be able to play this game well, although I do always enjoy it. One of the scoring cards was for having a large number of separate blocks of settlements; Camo and Olly picked up more of the special powers that helped with that (like shooting settlements in straight lines across the map) and that was reflected in the scores.

Final score – Camo: 69 / Olly: 61 / Me: 48 / Ali: 42

That was early October. More soon – there’s an all-day session at Newcastle Gamers starting very soon, with possibilities of A Feast for OdinGreat Western Trail and all sorts of other things old and new!

More January – Pfister Fun!

Continuing on from last time, more January gaming!

John Sh and I have managed a couple of Corbridge sessions in January (pretty impressive really, given how indisposed I’ve been by illness and child-rearing). The first featured My Village by Inka and Marcus Brand, an odd reworking of themes from their own Village, which I’ve played a few times and enjoyed a lot. My Village is, quite simply, better and more elegant. It’s like The Prodigals Club compared to Last Will – it’s clear that the theme works wonderfully, but it just needed a new set of mechanisms around it to really make it shine.

I tried to do a bit of everything with my villagers, which turns out to not be the way to play well. John specialised much more (he filled a massive church with monks), and it paid off in a 72–54 win for him. Great stuff – happy to play again.

Another Wednesday evening saw us playing Isle of Skye: From Chieftain to King, which is an unwieldy title for a fairly simple (yet quite thinky) tile-laying game from Austrian duo Andreas Pelikan and Alexander Pfister. (More Pfister to come later.) I struggled massively, mainly by doing quite well for the first few rounds and ending up in a death-spiral of cash. Doing slightly better than John meant that he got a monetary boost in the last few rounds, which coupled with his whisky-heavy tile layout to mean that he could set prices on his tiles much higher than I could even afford. John overhauled me on points in the very last round to win 76–65.

I got him back in Roll for the Galaxy though, with a completely vanilla base-game-only match coming out in a 48–41 win to me. It was all about the Developments.

Too many family games to mention scattered throughout the month, but highlights included Ticket to Ride: Europe (with everyone old enough to play getting a solid drubbing from me) and a whole afternoon of games with 8-year-old J, featuring K2 and a bit of Small World.

Oddly, the last Saturday of the month brought more family gaming… except with someone else’s family at Newcastle Gamers. John Sh and I happened to end up at a table with Ruth and her sons L and J (feels natural to just use initials for the under-18s), which meant that probably the entire Hexham/Corbridge-area contingent was playing together. And what were we playing? Concordia!

I’d been umming and ahhing about Concordia for a while, given that it’s often recommended to people who like games that I like. When Shut Up & Sit Down gave it a positive review, I quickly jumped and ordered it before it sold out, as often happens. So this was my first play and my first time teaching the game. Thankfully, the rules are incredibly simple (play a card and do the thing written on the card), so we were quickly up and running, even with the slightly fiddly setup process.

And it turns out it’s a little gem of a game. Turns are quick and simple (although they can be very thinky beforehand), downtime is minimal even with five players and it always feels like there’s something useful you can do. The big stack of cards for purchase all give boosts to your end-game scoring as well as increasing the power of your deck of cards, so it’s not too hard to develop a coherent strategy. Mine involved building in all the cloth-producing cities and acquiring the Weaver card, which gave me a Minerva bonus of 5 VPs per cloth city (i.e. 20 VPs by the end of the game) and let me produce loads of cloth by playing the card. 4 cloth = 28 cash = lots of other buildings, so after a slow start I could rapidly increase my building portfolio.

It turned out to be a decent strategy and I won by a reasonable margin (I think I had 137 and John was in second place with 110-something). J came in a very respectable third place, just over 100 – he’d been planning well throughout the game – then Ruth and finally L bringing up the rear. A really fun game with a “classic euro” feel to it. Must play it again soon.

We followed that with the return of Mister Pfister and Isle of Skye. It was quite a different beast with five players, and I managed to avoid the cash-death-spiral this time round. L seemed to be following a similar path to the one he trod in Concordia – acquire cash and hoard it – which meant he didn’t price his tiles very highly and I snagged one or two at bargain prices to complete various handy scoring features on my layout.

And as it turned out, I demolished everyone with a final score of 77. To be honest, I’m not sure what I think of Isle of Skye, but that might be because I still haven’t quite figured out how to play it properly yet. Maybe a 3- or 4-player game (without rogue tweens using degenerate cash strategies) would help me decide.

After Ruth and the boys left, John and I teamed up with Camo and Lloyd for more Pfister, this time in the form of his execrably named compact engine/tableau-builder Oh My Goods! Ugh. While the original title of Royal Goods was dull, at least it connected back to Pfister’s game Port Royal and it didn’t make me want to eat my own face off. Oh My Goods!? No. It makes it sound like some sort of party game or Munchkin-style take-that-fest.

Cards for buildings, cards for goods, cards for workers... cards for everything!

Cards for buildings, cards for goods, cards for workers… cards for everything! (Photo by John Sh)

Which is something that it very much isn’t. It takes elements from San Juan and marries them to bits of every engine-building and resource-conversion euro you’ve ever played, producing a fairly simple and elegant little maxi-filler. There’s a bit of push-your-luck involved with the morning and afternoon markets being revealed, which slightly grated with me, but it’s a light enough game that it didn’t matter. Camo ran away with it, with his seemingly magical cow-production line.

And last but never least, The King of Frontier. Although I managed to snag my beloved Altar by making sure I had a massive field completed very early on, and although I went full-on heavy on the Consume action (albeit with only one very small city), it wasn’t enough to outdo John’s little collection of VP-producing buildings. He beat me by just two points, with Camo and Lloyd a fair bit further back.

The King of Jauntily-Angled Frontier

The King of Jauntily-Angled Frontier (Photo by John Sh)

And that was January. February’s already underway, so I’m sure I’ll be back soon with more.