Newcastle Gamers – Saturday 12 September 2015

Madeira! Finally! I’d almost shot myself entirely in the foot by (several times) describing it as “the heaviest euro I own” and referencing my one previous play with John, after which we’d both felt like our brains were dripping out of our ears. Luckily, neither Álvaro nor Daniel had heard any of that and Olly was up for the challenge, so four-player Madeira it was.

An hour for rules (hardly surprising – there’s an astonishing amount to understand before you can even start to understand anything… if that makes any sense) and we were off. The initial layout of Crown Requests on the turn-order board was a bit odd – lots of rows with multiples of the same tiles, so some choices always seemed more tempting than others, regardless of the die rolls. My first round was spent (apart from re-explaining various bits of rules, partially because I’d muffed the original explanation a bit and partially because… well, it’s just a bit complex) aiming towards collecting some cash to score the Crown Request that awards up to 15 VPs for spending up to 15 reals. On the side, I was building up a sort of engine to make sure I could get enough resources to focus on some shipping later on and also pay for all the workers I’d shoved into fields. That was mainly a question of getting plenty of workers in fields in region 2, then always sending an action marker to Moinho in order to get 5 bread.

See all my red workers in the fields? See my red square action marker in Moinho? That's my engine, that is.

Round 2, in the daylight. See all my red workers in the fields? See my red square action marker in Moinho? That’s my engine, that is.

Álvaro, being the savvy gamer he is, quickly cottoned on to ways to aim towards his scoring goals, and successfully minimised his Pirate tokens throughout. He spent a lot of the game with a lot of workers in the cities, using them in every round to gain resources. I, on the other hand, was mainly gaining resources through harvesting fields, which tied in with using the Moinho building action for bread. Olly was worrying much less about bread, having gained very early in the game the Guild Favour that allowed him to move up the Windmill track (and thus feed an extra mouth per round) every time it was used.

Game end, daylight gone. Note how heavily everyone's gone for the cities... except me.

Game end, daylight gone. Note how heavily everyone’s gone for the cities… except me.

To cut a long story (or about two-and-a-half hours of game) short, Álvaro pipped me to the win. Slightly better management of the City Watch space and/or sending my ships to different colonies could have tipped it the other way, but there it was. Olly was a fair way back (after slightly fluffing the first round, which may have been my fault in the rules explanation – apologies) and Daniel got half of the winning score.

Final score – Álvaro: 95 / Me: 89 / Olly: 65 / Daniel: 47

Madeira is such a very me game. Lots of different things to manage in different areas of the board, opportunities for minor (and only minor) player screwage, opportunity/cost analysis throughout (huge in this game), slightly random but not too random… it’s all there. Yes, it’s heavy and no, you probably won’t play it well the first time round, but for me it’s absolutely worth the effort.

Next? Roll for the Galaxy! As if I hadn’t had enough of it recently (and I really hadn’t), out it came again – and this time, to a table of people who’d played it before. Except I really should have had a quick summary run-through of the rules because it turned out Daniel had either been mis-taught the game or had forgotten big chunks of it since the one time he’d played. Either way, it took a few rounds to iron out the bugs, but we just about got there in the end.

Yet another picture of Roll for the Galaxy on my blog.

Yet another picture of Roll for the Galaxy on my blog. This one prominently features my arm and my Wispa.

I started the game with the Galactic Renaissance development on my stack and a few worlds with middling values, so I decided to go heavy on Produce/Ship to stack up the VP chips. It almost didn’t work out, with a long mid-game lull as I slowly built Galactic Renaissance and tied up a whole bunch of dice therein. But once it was completed, I powered back into the Produce/Ship groove (and got a couple of nicely timed benefits from other people’s phase selections) and the game was over pretty quickly with a narrow win for me.

Final score – Me: 37 / Olly: 34 / Álvaro: 33 / Daniel: 30

Daniel left and was replaced by John for a game of Onward to Venus. The first time I played this, I was swept along by the theme and managed to overlook the game’s heavy reliance on random elements. This time, it rankled a bit more. I didn’t get as screwed by turn order as I had last time; rather, there often wasn’t much to aim for, with Mars and Venus being oddly devoid of factories and mines for most of the game.

I settled a little British colony in the outer reaches of the solar system and left the others to battle over most of the inner stuff between themselves. I timed badly an excursion to Mars in the third period (and didn’t leave enough protection for my new mine), meaning Álvaro could swoop in to take advantage of the Tension marker and take it from me, taking control of Mars. And… that was about it. It kind of felt like nothing much happened. Oh, I might have taken control of Earth. I honestly can’t recall.

Stuff going on across many worlds.

If there’s one thing that Onward to Venus is, it’s hungry for table space.

All in all, I feel like I don’t need to play Onward to Venus again. Don’t get me wrong – it’s fine. But there are so many games that are better than “fine”.

Final score – Álvaro: 40 / Me: 28 / Olly: 25 / John: 15

And that was that. One of those rarities at Newcastle Gamers: a whole evening of games I’d played before. It’s nice to have that once in a while!

Photos by Olly and John, shamelessly stolen from the Newcastle Gamers Google+ page. Newcastle Gamers is on the second and last Saturday of every month, 4:30 pm until late at Christ Church, Shieldfield, Newcastle upon Tyne!

One thought on “Newcastle Gamers – Saturday 12 September 2015

  1. John

    I wasn’t so impressed with my second experience of Onward to Venus either.

    I suspect the flatness was at least partly due to the disproportionate flood of “take two cards” tiles that came into play, at the expense of umpteen “do something interesting” tiles which might’ve been introduced instead (cf the discard heap pictured above!). This might be atypical … but I definitely came away from the game feeling a bit “meh” about the whole thing. It’s probably going to sit on the shelf for a long time before it gets another airing.

    Reply

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